Scam-Free Roofing Repair in NJ
 Rate Author :Current :2 / 5
  Views: 11129,  


The economy has pushed plenty of businesses outside their comfort zones. You can see reputable, reliable service providers following the same practices scam artists thrive upon to get business from unsuspecting marks. When it comes to roofing repair in NJ, it’s no longer a red flag to have someone approach your home and inform you that your home needs work. How can you tell the scam artists from the legitimate businesses out to do a service? Follow these tips.


Ask for a Written Estimate


Whether you’re dealing with scams or sales, you’re bound to run into type A personalities. They can be bold, brash and sometimes a bit pushy. Where you can tell the difference is whether they’re willing to risk their business’s reputation by making threatening remarks. Where a legitimate special offer might be available for just a short while, a real company offering roofing repair in NJ won’t rescind any special prices based on you seeking out other estimates.


Ask your unexpected visitor for a written estimate and contact information. Let them know you will be calling other companies, and if you decide to have them complete your repairs, you’ll get back to them. A scam artist will become angry at this point and tell you their special offer will no longer be valid at that point. They might even try to guilt you into having the work done because they’ve done a basic visual inspection for free. Every company is expected to provide this service. If they offered it, you owe them nothing.


Ask to See Credentials


Roofing contractors often have a license in their place of business, whereas individuals operating on their own will not. Asking to see someone’s license and comparing it to the license of other area businesses is a good way to tell if a company is legit. So is asking to see proof of insurance, training or certification by companies whose materials are used in roofing repair in NJ.


These can be more important than references because they cannot be faked. If John Smithson from Avalanche, KY, has a certificate for working with Slate Siding, a quick call to Slate will tell you if it’s legitimate. You can’t always tell if someone’s references really add up.


Check Their References and Their Portfolio


There are ways to check references that outsmart even the most tested scam artists. People who lie focus on factual details and not on personal experience. It’s the little things that are left out. A reference who stumbles to answer, “How did the workers act while repairing your roof?” is probably a fake. This is particularly true if they answer a different question. For instance, by responding, “It hardly took any time for them to finish the job.”


Consumers interested in roofing repair in NJ may find themselves wondering who they can trust. Thankfully, there are tells to indicate if a company is a scam. Check their attitudes, their credentials and their references before signing on. You may wind up getting a great deal on repairs or protecting other homeowners from being taken advantage of.







Leave a comment

Pls login first.